Morsel Spork

5 in 1 Camping, Travel, Lunch Utensils

Anyone who knows me knows I love my sporks.  Also, anyone who knows me knows I love camping.  So if you know me, you know I love making coffee and eating PB&Js while camping.  What is the perfect utensil for both of these delicious tasks at the campsite?  I am so glad you asked…the SPORK of course!

The spork holds a beloved place in my heart when it comes to utensils, perhaps to a fault.  Cue the dear wife as we walk through the camping stores, “Not another spork!”  It is not another one; it is a different one. My love for the spork probably originated in elementary school.  What fifth grader’s enjoyment of their square pizza and plastic cup of pudding was not made more special by that single plastic instrument that could handle both tasty tasks with equal aplomb.

Since then, many a spork has come and gone as my decades-long search for the perfect iteration of this campsite necessity continued.  Enter a new type of spork by Portland, Oregon based, Morsel.  A made in the USA, BPA free, dishwasher safe, nearly perfect fireside eating utensil.  Most sporks only have a spoon side and a fork side, hence, well, “spork.”  The morsel, which comes in two sizes, regular and XL, adds a rubber edged spatula along the edge of the spoon side giving you the ability to get right to the bottom of your favorite dehydrated meal bag or scrape out the last precious remnants of peanut butter from the jar.  Brilliant.  The spoon shape of most sporks just does not get that last taste from your cup or bag however Morsel’s flexible edge conforms to any shape and grabs every last taste.  And being that it comes in two sizes, the XL allows you to get to the very bottom of that peanut butter jar without getting your hand sticky.  On the subject of PB&J, the spatula is perfect for spreading one’s peanut butter on a slice of bread, an area in which most sporks fall flat.  If any light cutting is called for during your tent side meal prep, the sides of the fork are stiff with just enough of a serrated edge to dice up your favorite dehydrated pepper steak.

The morsel does not just lend itself to making the perfect campground PB&J.  It tackles other tasty treats just as well.  My technique for morning coffee in my favorite titanium French press calls for spooning out those yucky remaining grounds floating on the surface just before I press.  Most sporks do a well enough job with their spoon side but they never can quite get every little ground.  I put the Morsel’s spoon to the test with this step of my coffee ritual. Sure enough, the rubber edge of the spatula circled the pot leaving nary a grind behind.

So is the Morsel the perfect spork?  Time will tell but for now, it is making this campsite gourmet very happy.

Robbie Arkovich Arkovich

I have spent the better part of my life enjoying the outdoors, camping, hiking, paddle sports, bicycling, photography, shooting sports, and the like. I enjoy the diverse landscapes I find, whether it be hiking the mountain trails of the Rockies or paddling the serene waters of the Florida coastline. Being a gear hound, I enjoy the technical equipment aspect of all of my outdoor activities. All that time spent in the outdoors working with gear has given me a keen insight to what works, and more importantly, what does not. Now that I am retired, I have more time to enjoy my outdoor diversions; however, my new life on a retiree’s fixed income has made me very critical of every penny I spend on my equipment. The equipment I invest in simply has to work. If it works, I am happy. If it does not, someone is going to answer for it. I take this same theme when evaluating products. I am happy to see something perform well, but if it does not, there is going to be a discussion.

Morsel Spork

$12.95
9.7

Cost

10.0/10

Durability

10.0/10

Function

10.0/10

Weight

9.0/10

Fork

10.0/10

Spoon

10.0/10

Knife

8.0/10

Spatula

10.0/10

Cooking Spoon

10.0/10

What I liked

  • Rubber Edge for Scraping
  • Lightweight
  • Very Durable
  • Multiple Sizes
  • Dishwasher Safe

What I did not like

  • The knife is limited in what it can cut
  • Some cleats tore
  • Expensive